Thursday, July 18, 1996 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Release of Emmanuel Constant
1996-07-18

Capital Hill and the Internet

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When Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich seized the reins of Congress, he spun a futuristic vision in which laptop computers would be given to poor people and the internet would be a force for progress and, even, liberation. But Congress has been slow to fulfill that vision, and some will be surprised to learn that members of Congress themselves are spending very little time and money in cyberspace. An estimated 15 million people in the U.S. log onto computer networks each day, and that number is growing significantly each month. But if you try to find out what’s going on Capitol Hill or even just try to send electronic mail to your representatives, you’ll probably be disappointed. Chris Casey tried to change all that when he designed the first web site used by a Senator, while working in the office of Massachusetts Democrat Ted Kennedy three years ago.

Guest: Chris Casey, author, The Hill on the Net.

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