Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. In this US election year, Democracy Now! is more important than ever. For 20 years, we’ve put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power. We lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. A generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar if you donate right now. That means when you give $10, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you every day.

Your Donation: $

Corporate Classrooms

August 19, 1998
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

Topics

How much influence do corporations have in schools? Krystle Newquist will be entering ninth grade in a few weeks. But earlier this year, she was kicked off her little league team for refusing to wear the logo of the team’s sponsor — a tavern called "The Carousel." Krystle’s grandfather had suffered from alcoholism and cirrhosis of the liver.

According to students advocates and activists fighting corporate control of schools, cases like Krystle’s are likely to crop up more often as large companies secure deals that grant them exclusive rights to sell or promote their products in the nation’s public schools. In an infamous case in Georgia, a student was suspended for wearing a Pepsi T-shirt on the school’s official Coke Day.

What’s more, local school districts are increasingly contracting with what are known as Educational Maintenance Organizations or EMOs to manage schools. The for-profit EMOs promise that students will have greater access to resources, and it is often the poorer districts that hire them. But critics worry that the EMOs will make profits, not students, the bottom line.

Guests:

  • Diane Newquist, the mother of Krystle Newquist, who will be entering the 9th grade in Lemont, Illinois.
  • Marianne Manilov, with the Center for Commercial-Free Public Education. Call: 1-800-UNPLUG1.

Related links:

.
.
.


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.