Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. In this US election year, Democracy Now! is more important than ever. For 20 years, we’ve put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power. We lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. A generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar if you donate right now. That means when you give $10, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you every day.

Your Donation: $

Pepper Spray Deadlock</B>

August 26, 1998
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

California law enforcement came down hard on environmentalists in Humboldt County last November. Officers applied pepper spray directly to the eyes of protestors staging sit-ins at a lumber company and a Congressmember’s office. Perhaps you remember the pictures on TV — environmentalists screamed with pain as officers used cotton swabs to daub acid tear gas on their eyeballs. They say the authority’s actions amounted to torture. For the last three weeks, their case against local police and sheriffs charging as much has been being heard in federal court in San Francisco. What’s at stake, they say, is the use of pepper spray in any non-violent situation. Yesterday, Judge Vaughn R. Walker who’d been overseeing the case declared a mistrial after the jury deadlocked.

Guest:

  • Macon Cowles, lead co-counsel for the plaintiffs.

Related link:


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.