Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $
Wednesday, December 13, 2000 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Reno Blocks Palestinian’s Release
2000-12-13

U.S. Supreme Court Refuses to Allow Florida Recount, Bush Poised to Assume Presidency

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

Last night, in a 5-4 decision, a deeply divided U.S. Supreme Court refused to allow a recount of Florida votes. The ruling was handed down two hours before the deadline for choosing electors for the Electoral College. The crux of the court’s argument was that there was not enough time to conduct a recount, time the court itself constraint when it stopped the vote count last Saturday.

Divisions in the court ran along ideological lines. In the majority were Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy and Clarence Thomas. Dissenting were Justices John Paul Stevens, David H. Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer.

Souter and Breyer agreed there were constitutional problems with the recount ordered by the Florida court, but did not rule out the possibility of the state court being able to fix them if allowed to do so and thus did not join the 5-4 majority.

Guests:

  • Lani Guinier, Professor of Law at Harvard University.
  • Eric Foner, History professor at Columbia University and author of ??The Story of American Freedom.
  • David Kairys, professor of constitutional law, Temple University, author of ??The Politic of Law.
  • Alcee Hastings, democrat representative, Florida.

Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.