Monday, May 1, 2000 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | PREVIOUS: Teach-in On the 25th Anniversary of the End of the...
2000-05-01

Teach-in On Vietnam War: Vietnam Veteran and Vietnamese Ambassador to the United Nations

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

While 58,000 American soldiers, mostly from poor and working families, were killed in the Vietnam War, tens of thousands of others returned from the war with permanent physical and psychological scars. Many have been afflicted with post traumatic stress syndrome, alcoholism and drug dependency, while others developed cancers and had children with birth deformities caused by the chemical Agent Orange, and had to live with serious permanent injuries.

And the Vietnamese population is still suffering from the consequences of the war. With 300,000 missing in action, millions of civilians killed and soaring cancer rates due to Agent Orange, Vietnam also remains among the world’s poorest nations, with an average per capita income of $370 a year.

Guests:

  • Ben Chitty, Coordinator of the Clarence Fitch Chapter of the VietnamVeterans Against the War.
  • Ambassador Nguyen Thanh Chau, Permanent Representative of Vietnam to the United Nations.

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour

Stories

    Davis_mcbath_dunn_rally_protest_black-lives-matter
    Black Lives Matter: New Film on Jordan Davis Captures Family’s Struggle to Convict White Vigilante
    We are broadcasting from the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, where a new film takes on the subject of the growing nationwide protests over the killing of unarmed African Americans by examining one of the cases to make national headlines in recent years: the killing of 17-year-old Jordan Davis. The film, "3 1/2 Minutes," tells the story of what happened on Nov. 23, 2012, when four teenagers pulled into a Florida gas station to buy gum and cigarettes. They were soon confronted by Michael Dunn, a middle-aged white man who pulled...

Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.