Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2016. And, today a generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar. That means when you give $10 today, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? Please do your part today. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2016.

Your Donation: $

The Tale of Two Cities - Camden

July 31, 2000

The city of Camden, New Jersey is on the river that separates New Jersey from Philadelphia. Camden is a city like so many in the US, divided down racial and economic lines. The black and Latino part of Camden is appallingly impoverished.

Yet the waterfront of Camden is the pride of both New Jersey and the Republican Party, so much so that the Camden waterfront was the site of the opening gala cocktail party of the Republican National Convention held last night. Residents from the other side of Camden were subject to full police searches before they were allowed to protest outside while the Republicans inside sipped their cocktails, only a few miles away from one of the poorest neighborhoods in the country.

This is a tale of two cities. In 1998 Camden’s water services were privatized. Now residents in the poor part of Camden cannot drink the contaminated water that comes out of the old, rusted pipes. Youth unemployment is widespread and increasing. And now New Jersey Governor Christina Whitman is attempting to pass legislation through the Republican controlled state legislature that would effectively make the democratic voice of the residents of Camden a commodity, giving more power to a Governor appointed CEO than the locally elected city council.


  • Luis Morales, from the Concerned Citizens of North Camden and organizes around Vieques.
  • Councilmn Ali Slon-Eel, the Councilman for Camden, New Jersey.
  • Ivan Foster, the President of Democracy for Camden, NJ.