Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2015. Pretty exciting, right? Please do your part today. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2015.

Your Donation: $
Friday, August 18, 2000 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Democracy Now! Confronts Police Over Internal Document
2000-08-18

Al Gore Accepts Presidential Nomination From the Dem’s

DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

Al Gore launched his fall quest for the White House last night, pledging a "better, fairer, more prosperous America’’ in the climactic speech of the Democratic National Convention. He officially accepted the Democratic Party’s nomination for president. Gore pledged to fight for expanded health care, environmental protection, better education, targeted tax cuts, campaign finance reform, prescription drugs for Medicare recipients, and more. In remarks that seem to have been written for a different person, Gore said, "We’re for the people. Big tobacco, big oil, the big polluters, the pharmaceutical companies, the HMOs. Sometimes you have to be willing to stand up and say no, so families can have a better life.'’ We go now to an excerpt of Al Gore's acceptance speech.

Tape:

  • Al Gore’s Acceptance Speech

Guest:

  • Tom Hayden, State Senator in California. He is a veteran activist, one of the founders of Students for a Democratic Society in the early 1960s. He was also one of the Chicago 8 who were put on trial in Chicago in 1968, following the mass protests in the streets during the Democratic Convention.

Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.