Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. In this US election year, Democracy Now! is more important than ever. For 20 years, we’ve put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power. We lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. A generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar if you donate right now. That means when you give $10, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you every day.

Your Donation: $

Cipro: The Battle Over Bayer

October 23, 2001
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

Today we’re going to look at the pharmaceutical giant Bayer, the maker of Cipro.

Bayer has long been a controversial company, beginning with its roots in the German company IG Farben, which workedhand in hand with the Nazis.

It has been sued by holocaust survivors for its role in forced labor, medical experiments and other crimes.

Its been sued by people with Hemophilia who contracted AIDS though tainted blood transfusions.

And it has been targeted by AIDS activists around the world for fighting against cheap AIDS drugs for poorercountries.

Cipro, the antibiotic that many say can help treat anthrax, is ten times as expensive as generic equivalents. That’swhat made Senator Charles Schumer call for the Bush Administration to break Bayer’s patent and produce genericequivalents of the drug.

The Bayer/Cipro controversy is a microcosm of the global conflict between public health and private profit, betweenthe needs of poor countries for cheap medicines and the desire of rich corporations to preserve their patents. Its aconflict that will come to head in a little over a week when the WTO hold’s a major ministerial meeting in Qatar,where poor countries will press the US to relax drug patents on life saving medicines.

Guests:

  • Sharon Anne Lynch, Health Gap global access project and ACT-UP New York.
  • James Love, Consumer Project on Technology.
  • Philipp Mimkes, Coordination Against BAYER-Dangers (CBG).

Related links:


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.