Bi-Lingual Education Lost in Massachusetts But Won in Colorado; Oregon Rejects Universal Health Care and Genetically Modified Foods Measures

November 06, 2002


Voters in many states faced a series of initiatives and referendums at the polls. Bilingual education came under attack in two states.

In Massachusetts, voters chose to ban the state’s 30-year old bilingual education program by more than a two-to-one margin.

In Colorado, voters said "no" to Amendment 31, an almost identical measure to ban bilingual education.

Educators and politicians in both states had warned the measure would spell disaster for students struggling to learn English.

In Oregon, two of the most closely watched and intensely fought ballot initiatives did not pass yesterday.

Measure 27 would have required labels identifying genetically engineered foods sold in the state. It is the first initiative of its kind in the U.S. Biotech companies contributed 4.6 million dollars to fight the measure. Top contributors were Monsanto, a leading producer of genetically engineered crops and Dupont.

Measure 23 would have created a universal health care system for all Oregon residents. Again, the opposition to the campaign was financed from big business interests with $1.2 million coming from health insurance providers.


  • Tim Duncan, Chairman, Vote No on Question 2 campaign, MA.
  • Gully Stanford, Co-Chair of English Plus campaign that opposed the ban on bilingual education in Colorado. He is also a member of the State Board of Education of Colorado Lower third: Opposes ban on bi-lingual education.
  • Xander Patterson, Executive Director, Physicians for Social Responsibility, OR.

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