Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the Dakota Access pipeline protests or news about this unprecedented US presidential election—and our coverage is never paid for by the oil and gas companies or the campaigns and superPACs. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on your support. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $8 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

North Korea Accuses U.S. of Plotting War and Vows to Fight to the Last Man; South Korea Denounces Heavy U.S. Economic Pressure On the North

December 31, 2002
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

North Korea today accused the United States of plotting a war against it and vowed to fight "to the last man," hours after it expelled two U.N. monitors.

Meanwhile, both South Korea’s president and president-elect urged negotiations to end the standoff between Washington and North Korea.

In a sharp rebuke to the US, Kim Dae Jung, South Korea’s outgoing president, said Washington’s new policy of "tailored containment" to isolate North Korea economically would prove ineffective.

Kim vowed to continue his policy of engagement with North Korea.

Criticism is also growing in the U.S. where Congressional leaders have charged President Bush with creating the crisis in North Korea.

North Korea says that it is willing resolve concerns over its nuclear program if the United States signs a non-aggression treaty. Washington has ruled out any such talks.

On Friday North Korea ordered the expulsion of the two U.N. monitors, depriving the U.N. atomic agency of its final means of monitoring a nuclear program Washington fears will be used to produce atomic weapons.

In response the White House has said they are considering using heavy economic pressure on North Korea.

Yesterday North Korea also hinted that it may withdraw from the global nuclear arms control treaty in response to what it described as the US’s violation of a 1994 deal to provide energy in return for the scrapping of Pyongyang’s plutonium program.

Guest:

  • Tim Shorrock, freelance reporter who has been writing about U.S.-Korean relations for more than 20 years.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.