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Thousands of Activists Converge at the World Social Forum to Weave a New Vision of Reality

February 04, 2002
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Over the last few days, thousands of activists are converging at the World Social Forum to weave a new vision ofreality, one in which humans and nature replace profits and power as the center of concern. The forum’s theme:another world is possible.

The first World Social Forum was held last year, in Porto Alegre, as a kind of "people’s" counterweight to the WorldEconomic Forum. It began as a conversation between Brazilian workers, farmers, intellectuals, and clerics, and ittriggered strong and immediate international support. Up to 20,000 people gathered at the forum for marches,workshops, testimonies, and movement building. In just a few short days, the WSF came to embody the growing movementagainst corporate-driven globalization.

This year’s World Social Forum picks up where the last one left off, yet even bigger. As many as 40,000 activistshave gathered in Porto Alegre, including fisherfolk from India, farmers from East Africa, trade unionists fromThailand, indigenous people from Central America, and two Democracy Now producers from New York City. We have a mixof the voices at the forum, sent to us by producers Kris Abrams and Deepa Fernandez. We begin with Marian Albina, ofthe Palestine Organization for Youth, and move to Jose Bove, French farmer and global justice activist.

Tape:

  • Voices from the World Social Forum

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