Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $
Friday, March 1, 2002 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: The Colombian Government Declares a War Zone in a Large...
2002-03-01

As President Bush Finishes a Whirlwind Series of Meetings with Three African Leaders, We Speak with a South African Activist and Scholar About "Global Apartheid"

DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

There is a lot of news about Africa that simply does not make it into the mainstream papers. For example, President Bush has just met with leaders of three African nations in the last week. He met with the president of Angola — this, just days after rebel leader Jonas Savimbi was killed; he met with the President of Botswana; and he met with the President of Mozambique.

Then there is South Africa. Thabo Mbeki came to New York at the beginning of February for the World Economic Forum. He was not out there protesting; he was inside, marketing his "New Project for Africa’s Development" (Nepad). The project garnered widespread corporate applause during the WEF, and will soon be the subject of similar attention at the upcoming G-8 meeting in Canada. It is Mbeki’s solution to what he, and others in his government, have described as "global apartheid." But is Mbeki, along with other leading South Africans, really seeking to break the chains of global apartheid–or merely to shine them? Today, we speak with author and activist, Patrick Bond, about globalization, poverty, and the struggle for economic justice in South Africa. He has just completed a book called Against Global Apartheid.

Guest:

  • Patrick Bond, Alternative Information and Development Centre in Johannesburg. He is also an associate professor at the University of the Witwatersrand Graduate School of Public and Development Management.

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour

Stories


Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.