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Kaveh Golestan 1950-2003: A Look at the Life of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Iranian Photojournalist Who Was One of 10 International Journalists Killed in Iraq

April 10, 2003
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The lives of Michael Kelly and David Bloom have become widely known across the country over the past week. They are the two U.S. journalists who died while covering the invasion of Iraq. Kelly, an editor of Atlantic Monthly, was killed on Friday and Bloom, an NBC TV host, died on Saturday.

But receiving less attention have been the many international reporters who have died since the attack began. They include Al Jazeera reporter Tariq Ayoub; Reuters TV cameraman Taras Protsyuk; Jose Couso, a Spanish cameraman for Madrid-based TeleCinco; reporter Julio Anguita Parrado of the Spanish daily El Mundo; German reporter Christian Liebig of the weekly Focus magazine; BBC translator Kamaran Abdurazaq Muhamed; ITV news correspondent Terry Lloyd; Paul Moran, a free-lance cameraman for Australia’s ABC News. And finally there was Pulitzer Prize winning cameraman Kaveh Golestan who died after stepping on a landmine.

Yesterday we talked to Wall Street Journal reporter Farnaz Fassihi, to talk about Golestan, an Iranian cameraman. We talked to Fassihi shortly after the statue of Saddam Hussein had fallen in Baghdad.

  • Farnaz Fassihi, Middle East correspondent of the Wall Street Journal.

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