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Pentagon Advisor Richard Perle on North Korea: "We Should Always be Prepared to Go it Alone, if Necessary"

June 12, 2003
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Democracy Now! speaks with author John Feffer about the U.S. and North Korea.

Pentagon advisor Richard Perle said yesterday the U.S. should be prepared to unilaterally and preemptively attack North Korea to destroy its nuclear facilities.

Perle added, "We should always be prepared to go it alone, if necessary."

Perle also suggested North Korea may attempt to help Al Qaeda. He said: "I think we must assume that if they had a nuclear weapon, and if al Qaeda wished to purchase a nuclear weapon, it’s a deal that could be done."

Perle’s comments come a week after the U.S. announced that it would pull back it 37,000 troops stationed along the North Korea-South Korea border.

By removing the troops from the demilitarized military zone, some analysts say the U.S. is making its troops less vulnerable to an attack or counterattack from North Korea.

Meanwhile in South Korea, candlelight vigils are scheduled across the country tomorrow to mark the year anniversary since two South Korean middle school girls were run over by a United States armored vehicle. The soldiers who had been driving the vehicle were acquitted of negligent homicide by a U.S. military court.

Thousands are expected to take part in memorial services in Seoul and other major cities nationwide. The protesters are demanding the U.S. reverse the acquittal and for President Bush to issue an apology.

In Seoul, participants plan to march toward the U.S. embassy, but the Korea Times reports that 10,000 police officers will be deployed with orders to block protesters from bringing in U.S. flags and effigies of President Bush.

  • John Feffer, author of the forthcoming book North Korea, South Korea: U.S. Policy at a Time of Crisis (Seven Stories). He is also the editor of Power Trip: U.S. Unilateralism and Global Strategy After September 11

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