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2004-03-03

Kerry Wins 9 of 10 in Super Tuesday, Edwards Drops Out

Guests

Kamel Labidi, An independent journalist and former director of the Tunisian section of Amnesty International. He left Tunisia in 1996 because he was denied the right to work. He joins us on the phone from his home in Cairo, Egypt.

Mahdi Bray, Executive director of the "Muslim American Society Freedom Foundation".

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Sen. John Kerry locked up the Democratic presidential nomination winning nine of ten states on Super Tuesday. His top opponent Sen. John Edwards announced he is dropping out of the race. Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean denied Kerry a sweep winning his home state two weeks after dropping out.

Sen. John Kerry locked up the Democratic presidential nomination last night winning nine of ten states on Super Tuesday including New York and California. His top opponent Sen. John Edwards announced today that he is dropping out of the race after failing to win any of the 10 states up for grabs. Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean denied Kerry a sweep winning his home state two weeks after dropping out of the race.

The Rev. Al Sharpton won just 8% of the vote in his home state of New York, trailing far behind Kerry’s 60. Sharpton did not get a majority of the vote from African Americans or Hispanics winning 40% and 10% respectively.

Ohio Congressman Dennis Kucinich won 9% of the vote in his home state of Ohio to Kerry’s 52%.

Sen. Edwards ended his candidacy today in his home state of North Carolina. The Washington Post reports Edwards was under pressure from within the party to quit to allow Kerry to focus his energies and resources on President Bush as well as preserve his own prospects of becoming the party’s vice presidential nominee.

After a congratulatory call to Kerry, Edwards spoke to his supporters in Atlanta.

  • Sen. John Edwards, speaking in Atlanta, GA on March 2, 2004.

Frontrunner John Kerry rolled up huge Super Tuesday triumphs in California, New York, Ohio, Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Minnesota and his home state of Massachusetts, as well as a razor-thin 5-point win over Edwards in Georgia.

President Bush last night called Kerry to congratulate him on his victories.

Tuesday was the biggest single day of the nominating season, with 10 states and over 1,100 delegates at stake. Looking at the exit polls, the New York Times says Kerry did well among "virtually every category of Democratic voter coast to coast." The Washington Post emphasizes that voters again saw "electability" as a key Kerry asset.

Kerry spoke to supporters at the Old Post Office Pavilion in Washington DC, strategically close to the White House.

  • Sen. John Kerry, speaking in Washington DC on March 2, 2004.

Kerry has won 27 of 30 primaries and caucuses this year. Among those eliminated along the way are Sen. Bob Graham of Florida, former Illinois Sen. Carol Moseley Braun, Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, retired Army Gen. Wesley Clark and Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean.

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