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Friday, September 16, 2011 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: 40 Years After Attica Rebellion, New Tapes Reveal Nixon,...
2011-09-16

Troy Davis’s Sister: "The Fight for Troy Has Brought Us a Whole New Family All Over the World"

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The campaign to stop the Sept. 21 execution of death row prisoner Troy Davis has been led by his sister, Martina Correia, who herself is fighting for her life in a bout with cancer. We’re joined by Troy Davis’s other sister, Kimberly Davis, from Savannah to talk about the global day of action to save her brother. "Even though Martina is sick now in the hospital, she is still fighting from her hospital bed," Davis says. "We’re not only fighting for justice for Troy; we’re fighting for the Troy Davises that came before him, for the Troy Davises that are going to come after him. The fight for Troy Davis has brought a whole new family to us...all over the world." [includes rush transcript]

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We are now joined on the telephone by Troy’s sister, Kimberly Davis, in Savannah, Georgia.

Kimberly Davis, welcome to Democracy Now! Today is a day of action around the world that’s been organized to appeal for Troy Davis not to be executed. Tell us what’s happening.

KIMBERLY DAVIS: Well, today in Atlanta, Georgia—well, actually, I just want to thank everyone for having me on the show. But just to let you know a little bit about today, we have three buses coming from Savannah, going to Atlanta, and we’re leaving Savannah, Georgia, today at 12:00 p.m. And we’re going to take a trip down to Atlanta, where we’re going to have a rally starting at 5:00 p.m.—I’m sorry, 6:00 p.m. at Woodruff Park, going down to Ebenezer Baptist Church, where we’re going to have a prayer vigil for Troy today. And there are going to be different actions of solidarity all around the world for Troy. And, I mean, we have San Francisco, Hollywood, California; Oakland, California; Colorado; Arizona; Birmingham, Alabama; Vermont. We have something in Peru, London. I mean, it’s all over the world. It’s worldwide.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Kimberly, this enormous support that is coming for your brother, could you talk about the impact on your family as you’re waiting these days to see if this execution can be reversed?

KIMBERLY DAVIS: Well, on yesterday, when the parole board delivered their 650,000 petitions, Troy actually saw it on a news break, and Troy called me. And his words were—you know, he said, "Wow!" He said that "I didn’t know" — he said, "I knew I had supporters." He said, "But I didn’t know this many people around the world were supporting me." And he just wanted to just thank everyone for their support. And he said that, you know, that’s all we want, is for justice and for his case to be heard and, you know, for justice to come out and the truth to come out. But I mean, he was just so elated on yesterday. He’s like, you know, "It’s just amazing." And he said, you know, "650,000 petitions." And I told him, I said, "The number didn’t count at 650,000, because the number is still growing."

AMY GOODMAN: Kimberly Davis, your brother Troy is in isolation right now, is that right? He can talk to family, non-contact visits. He can’t talk to the press?

KIMBERLY DAVIS: No, ma’am, he can’t talk to the press. And actually, we went to see Troy on last Saturday, and we’re going back again this weekend to visit him. But we still can’t have contact visits. And when we went last Saturday to visit him, you know, someone asked, "Well, did he talk about his execution next week?" And I said, "Execution didn’t even come up in our conversation." It was just, you know, our regular conversations that we had. He was talking with my niece about her school and ballet, because she’s three. She’s been in ballet like a year, so, you know, she shows Uncle Troy her different things that she learns in ballet. Troy—and it’s so funny, because, you know, he was even still with her on last Saturday—she was showing him her ballet moves, and then he was trying to do it.

And it was just so touching, because when we got there, it was—the way they had Troy, the gate—we was actually able—it was little holes in the gate. And he actually stuck his finger to the gate, and he told my niece, he said, "Now, Kerstin, stick your finger here." And she stuck her little finger to the gate, and she touched his hand, and he touched her hand. And, you know, it almost brought tears to his eyes, because he said that this is the first time in two years that he was able to touch her. And when the guard opened up the flap to put his food through the flap, my niece actually almost stepped on the guard’s foot, but she stuck her hand in the flap, and she grabbed Troy’s hand. And she told me she said, "Uncle Troy," she said, "I love you so much." And he said, "I love you, too." And he said, you know, that was something that was touching for him, because that was his first time in almost two years of being able to touch her.

AMY GOODMAN: And I know this is a hard time for you. This is the fourth death warrant signed for your brother, Troy Davis.

KIMBERLY DAVIS: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: He has international support, as you’ve pointed out, everyone from the Archbishop of South Africa Desmond Tutu to the Pope, to former President Jimmy Carter. We’ve usually spoken with your sister, Martina. She learned of the death warrant date as she was coming out of the hospital. She is the face of Savannah for—around the issue of fighting breast cancer, on the mammogram vehicles for indigent getting mammograms. She has been honored along with Nancy Pelosi for fighting for women’s health and has also been fighting, like you, for her brother. So Troy faces death, and Martina is very sick right now. Final thoughts, Kim?

KIMBERLY DAVIS: Yes, ma’am. You know, even though Martina, she is sick now, she’s in the hospital, but yet, still, she’s still fighting from her hospital bed, because she has her phone, where she’s calling, you know, steady calling and making calls, checking emails and, you know, just asking people to continue their support. And, you know, it’s not only—we’re not only fighting for justice for Troy; we’re fighting for justice for the Troy Davises that came before him, for the Troy Davises that are actually going to come after him. And, you know, we just want everyone to know that we just love you. We thank you for all of your support, because, you know, together, this, the justice for Troy, the fight for Troy Davis, has brought a whole new family to us. We have family all over the world, you know, that we can now—you know, we all love you the same and just want to thank God for you and all your support.

AMY GOODMAN: Kimberly Davis, we want to thank you for being with us, Troy Davis’s sister. We will continue to follow what happens in this case. The death warrant has been signed for September 21st, next Wednesday.

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