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Democracy Now! Blog

"99 Percenters Occupy Wall Street" By Amy Goodman

2,000 people occupied Wall Street on Saturday. They weren’t carrying the banner of the tea party, the Gadsden flag with its coiled snake and the threat “Don’t Tread on Me.” Yet their message was clear:“We are the 99 percent that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1 percent.”

Democracy Now! Special Broadcast on Wednesday, Sept. 21: Troy Davis Scheduled Execution in Georgia (6-8pm EDT)

Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman will host a live 2-hour special broadcast on Wednesday, September 21 from 6pm to 8pm EDT from outside the prison in Jackson, Georgia, where death row prisoner Troy Anthony Davis is scheduled to be executed at 7pm EDT.

September 20, 2011 |  Filed under  Upcoming Shows, Troy Davis, Death Penalty

Will the Next Man Rick Perry Executes Die Because He’s Black?

Democracy Now! producer Renée Feltz reports for The Nation that Texas jurors were told that convicted murderer Duane Buck posed “future dangerousness” because of his race. He is scheduled to die on September 15.

"Troy Davis and the Politics of Death." By Amy Goodman

Death brings cheers these days in America. In this week’s Republican presidential debate, when CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked, hypothetically, if a man who chose to carry no medical insurance, then was stricken with a grave illness, should be left to die, cheers of “Yeah!” filled the hall. When, in the prior debate, Gov. Rick Perry was asked about his enthusiastic use of the death penalty in Texas, the crowd erupted into sustained applause. This dynamic is why challenging the death sentence to be carried out against Troy Davis by the state of Georgia on Sept. 21 is so important.

September 14, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Death Penalty, Troy Davis, Rick Perry, Texas, Prison

"9/11 Victim 0001: Father Mychal’s Message" By Amy Goodman

The body bag marked “Victim 0001” on Sept. 11, 2001, contained the corpse of Father Mychal Judge, a Catholic chaplain with the Fire Department of New York. His was the first recorded death from the attacks that morning. His life’s work should be central to the 10th anniversary commemorations of the Sept. 11 attacks: peace, tolerance and reconciliation.

September 07, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, 9/11, New York, Gay Rights, 9/11 anniversary, War, Peace, Catholic Church

A Lifetime of Resistance in Syria

Democracy Now! correspondent, Sharif Abdel Kouddous profiles renowned Syrian human rights lawyer, Haitham al-Maleh, for The Nation magazine. Maleh, 81, has spent most of his life fighting against government oppression in Syria. Today, he believes victory could be at hand.

September 02, 2011 |  Filed under  News, Syria, Protests, Human Rights

"Cheney, Rumsfeld and the Dark Art of Propaganda." By Amy Goodman

“When one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it,” wrote Joseph Goebbels, Germany’s Reich minister of propaganda, in 1941. Former Vice President Dick Cheney seems to have taken the famous Nazi’s advice in his new book, “In My Time.”

August 31, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, War on Terror, Iraq, Afghanistan, Dick Cheney, War, Bush

"D.C. Protests That Make Big Oil Quake." By Amy Goodman

The White House was rocked Tuesday, not only by a 5.8-magnitude earthquake, but by the protests mounting outside its gates. More than 2,100 people say they’ll risk arrest there during the next two weeks. They oppose the Keystone XL pipeline project, designed to carry heavy crude oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

"San Francisco Bay Area’s BART Pulls a Mubarak." By Amy Goodman

What does the police killing of a homeless man in San Francisco have to do with the Arab Spring uprisings from Tunisia to Syria? The attempt to suppress the protests that followed. In our digitally networked world, the ability to communicate is increasingly viewed as a basic right. Open communication fuels revolutions — it can take down dictators. When governments fear the power of their people, they repress, intimidate and try to silence them, whether in Tahrir Square or downtown San Francisco.

Verizon Workers, Management Dig in for Decisive Labor Battle 'This is no ordinary strike'

Democracy Now co-host, Juan Gonzalez, reports in the New York Daily News that on the 10th day of the most important labor fight in America, hundreds of striking Verizon workers have vowed to stay out as long as necessary.

"From Hiroshima to Fukushima: Japan’s Atomic Tragedies." By Amy Goodman

In 1945, the U.S. suppressed reports of its A-bombs. In 2011, Japan censors Fukushima’s radiation. When will we learn?

"War, Debt and the President." By Amy Goodman

President Barack Obama touted his debt ceiling deal Tuesday, saying, “We can’t balance the budget on the backs of the very people who have borne the biggest brunt of this recession.” Yet that is what he and his coterie of Wall Street advisers have done.

"War Is a Racket" By Amy Goodman

Military contract whistleblower Bunny Greenhouse’s legal win is welcome, but U.S. taxpayers are out $5 trillion for the wars of Bush and Obama. Why isn’t war a central issue in the U.S. debt talks?

July 27, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Iraq, Whistleblowers, Financial Meltdown

"Rupert Murdoch Doesn’t Eat Humble Pie." By Amy Goodman

“People say that Australia has given two people to the world,” Julian Assange told me in London recently, “Rupert Murdoch and me.” Assange, the founder of the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks, was humbly dismissing my introduction of him, to a crowd of 1,800 at East London’s Troxy theater, in which I suggested he had published perhaps more than anyone in the world. He said Murdoch took that publishing prize. Two days later, the Milly Dowler phone hacking story exploded, and Murdoch would close one of the largest newspapers in the world, his News of the World, within a week.

"The Questions Hanging Over Murdoch, USA." By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

The contagion affecting Rupert Murdoch and News Corp has spread rapidly in the US. The FBI is investigating potential criminal hacking of the voicemails of victims of the 9/11 attacks. Lawmakers and grassroots groups are also calling for an investigation into whether the bribing of police was a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. As News Corp is a US corporation, registered in the business-friendly state of Delaware,even bribery abroad could lead to felony charges in the US.

July 17, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Murdoch Media Scandal

Sharif Abdel Kouddous: "Five Months of Waiting: What Happens When A Revolution Stalls Out?"

From Sharif’s new article in "Foreign Policy": "Five months after the fall of Hosni Mubarak, Tahrir Square has, once again, been transformed into a mass protest encampment and the epicenter of the struggle for change in Egypt. Thousands of protesters are entering the second week of a sit-in reminiscent of the one that captured the world’s attention during the 18-day uprising that began on Jan. 25."

July 17, 2011 |  Filed under  News, Egypt, Arab Spring

"Soldier Suicides and the Politics of Presidential Condolences." By Amy Goodman

President Barack Obama just announced a reversal of a long-standing policy that denied presidential condolence letters to the family members of soldiers who commit suicide. Official silence, however, has long stigmatized those who die of self-inflicted wounds. The change marks a long-overdue shift in the recognition of the epidemic of soldier and veteran suicides in this country and the toll of the hidden wounds of war.

July 13, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Obama, Veterans, Iraq, Afghanistan, War on Terror

Watch: Full Video of WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange & Philosopher Slavoj Žižek With Amy Goodman

In one of his first public events since being held under house arrest, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange appeared in London Saturday for a conversation with Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek, moderated by Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman. They discussed the impact of WikiLeaks on world politics, the release of the Iraq and Afghanistan war logs, and Cablegate — the largest trove of classified U.S. government records in history. [includes rush transcript]

"WikiLeaks, Wimbledon and War" By Amy Goodman

Last Saturday was sunny in London, and the crowds were flocking to Wimbledon and to the annual Henley Regatta. Julian Assange, the founder of the whistle-blower website Wikileaks.org, was making his way by train from house arrest in Norfolk, three hours away, to join me and Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek for a public conversation about WikiLeaks, the power of information and the importance of transparency in democracies.

U.S. Officials: Pakistan Spy Agency Deliberately Killed Journalist

Obama administration officials have told the New York Times that senior officials of the Pakistani spy agency, the ISI, ordered the killing of Pakistani journalist Saleem Shahzad of the Asia Times in an effort to silence him. One U.S. official said, “Every indication is that this was a deliberate, targeted killing that was most likely meant to send shock waves through Pakistan’s journalist community and civil society." Ali Dayan Hasan, the head of Human Rights Watch in Pakistan, first tied the ISI to Shahzad’s killing. Hasan recently spoke to Democracy Now! in his most extended interview in the U.S. press.

July 05, 2011 |  Filed under  News, Pakistan, Freedom of the Press