Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $

10 de Noviembre de 2011

Informe sobre los miles de niños nacidos en Estados Unidos que languidecen en el sistema de acogida temporal mientras sus padres inmigrantes están detenidos o son deportados

Splash_image20111110-13854-n400xe-0

Escuche/Vea/Lea (en inglés)

Un nuevo informe analiza la situación de miles de niños nacidos en Estados Unidos que son introducidos en el sistema de guarda cuando sus padres son detenidos o deportados por no ser ciudadanos estadounidenses. La investigación fue realizada por el Centro de Investigación Aplicada y lleva el título "Shattered Families: The Perilous Intersection of Immigration Enforcement and the Child Welfare System" (Familias destrozadas: la peligrosa articulación entre la Agencia de Inmigración y el Sistema de Bienestar Infantil). El trabajo da cuenta de al menos 5.100 niños que viven actualmente en centros de acogida temporal o con familias sustitutas, a quienes se les impide juntarse con sus padres detenidos o deportados. Si nada cambia, los investigadores preven que otros 15.000 niños podrían terminar dentro del sistema de guarda en los próximos cinco años. Hablamos con Seth Freed Wessler, investigador a cargo del informe.