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Thursday, April 18, 1996

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    Mother Jones magazine has just released an expose of the cigarette industry which reveals big tobacco’s deep ties to the Republican Party, as well as the industry’s strategy to defeat regulation, a strategy that includes intimidation and bribery. The special report documents the flow of money to Bob Dole (Mother Jones calls Dole "Marlboro’s Man") GUEST: Jeffrey Klein, Editor of Mother Jones.


    Pacifica National Affairs Correspondent Larry Bensky just got back from Georgia where he got the chance to interview several candidates for Congress including Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney, her challenger in her new district Comer Yates and one of the Democrats who is vying for the Democratic nomination in Newt Gingrich’s district.


    This week two U.S. Marines were Court Martialled for refusing to allow the military to take a blood and tissue samples from them for DNA identification. While the Pentagon claims the DNA would only be used to help identify service members killed in combat, the marines were worried that their genetic information could be used against them in the future, perhaps by insurance companies which have been known to deny health coverage to people who carry certain genes that are associated with diseases. The issue of DNA testing has raised the specter of "genetic discrimination" and poses serious questions about how science and technology can come into conflict with our privacy and democracy.