Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If everyone who visited our website in the next week donated just $15, we would cover all of our operating costs for the year. We can't do it without you. Please donate today. It takes just a couple of minutes to do your part to make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $

Friday, January 24, 1997

download:   Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Clinton Proposes Cuts to Medicare

    This week, President Clinton unveiled his plan to reform Medicare, the federal health insurance program that guarantees medical care to the elderly. The proposal included a plan to slash Medicare spending by $140 billion over the next six years. Although the heavy cuts in Medicare appeared to contradict President Clinton’s campaign pledges last year, it was widely seen as a conciliatory gesture to the Republican-controlled Congress. But what does this new plan mean and who will pay for the cuts?

  • NY Trade Union Offers Alternative to HMO

    Managed care companies have come under sharp criticism from patients and health workers for denying care, cutting corners and then posting big profits. Now one New York-based trade union is offering an alternative to HMO’s.

  • Peru Government Cracks Down on Media Coverage of Hostage Crisis

    The hostage crisis in Peru has dropped off the media’s radar screen in recent weeks. Like with any story, interest wanes. But alarmed by the media attention that the guerrillas of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement received when they first took over the Japanese ambassador’s home on Dec. 17, the Peruvian government has launched crack down on media coverage of the siege.