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Thursday, September 4, 1997

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  • Good Samaritan Law

    Among the charges that the six photographers and a motorcyclist held in connection with the death of Princess Diana face is failure to obey the French Good Samaritan law. But what are strangers obligated to do when faced with a humanitarian crisis? Does it apply to police?

  • Washington, DC Control Board

    The head of the Congressional Committee overseeing municipal government in Washington, DC said yesterday that a plan to strip D.C. elected officials of most of their powers is a done deal. But Virginia Congressman Tom Davis(r) said that once the city gets its finances in order, some of the restrictions may be removed.

  • Civil Rights Leader Kunstler Remembered

    Two years ago today civil rights attorney William Kunstler died. He represented many celebrated cases from Leonard Peltier at wounded knee to the Chicago seven trial, a 1978 riot case at the Chicago Democratic National Convention involving Abby Hoffman, Jerry Rubin.

  • Safari Subsidy?

    The House of Representatives today is expected to take up a small but hotly contested provision in a foreign aid bill that provides millions of dollars to a development project in Zimbabwe, Africa. The project, called the Communal Areas Management Program for Indigenous Resources, or CAMPFIRE, is described by the US Agency for International Development as a rural economic development project. But opponents say that it benefits big-game trophy hunting, including the hunting of elephants.