Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $

Monday, December 21, 1998

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • War in Washington

    Former presidents and one-time political opponents Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford have added their voices to the censure vote, proposing in today’s New York Times a bipartisan censure resolution which would be voted by the Senate and accepted by Clinton.

  • War Proves Effective Advertising

    Although the U.S. and Britain launched more cruise missiles than during the Gulf War, by the United State’s own admission, most targets were either not hit, or damaged only moderately. Sites of suspected biological and chemical weapons were not targeted, the Pentagon said, to avoid the release of the agents into the atmosphere. These sites were the subject of a critical report by the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM), and that were used by the U.S. as a reason for launching the attacks on the eve of the scheduled impeachment debate.

  • Scientists Examine Biological Damage From Depleted Uranium

    This past November, Democracy Now! producer Jeremy Scahill traveled to Iraq and spent a few days in Basra, where he had the chance to visit communities and hospitals, and talk to residents in the area, which was heavily hit during the Persian Gulf War. Doctors there told him about a dramatic rise in cancer, birth defects and other illnesses, and attributed this to the use of depleted uranium by the U.S. military. Depleted uranium is used in the manufacture of bullets that are able to pierce armored tanks, and they were used both during the Gulf War and in the latest air strikes against Iraq. In a town called Socorro, in New Mexico, similar health problems were noticed by area residents. The town has been site since 1972 of a depleted uranium testing plant at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.