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Thursday, July 16, 1998

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  • General Motors

    Calling two strikes at General Motors a calamity for the community, a federal judge Wednesday ordered the two sides to set up an arbitration meeting on company claims the work stoppages are illegal.

  • Puerto Rico

    The largest labor protest in Puerto Rico ended last Wednesday following a 48-hour national strike. Half a million people joined in the demonstration against the sale of the state-owned Puerto Rican Telephone Company to the Connecticut-based GTE company.

  • The Singleton Case

    In the wake of last week s historic federal appeals court decision turning aside the practice by which the U.S. Department of Justice buys testimony against accused citizens, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers is urging Congress and the Justice Department to change that practice across the board. The NACDL says the Justice Department s practice of promising leniency to jailhouse informants in exchange for their testimony is a violation of the federal bribery statute, and a federal court seems to agree. In their ruling on United States vs. Singleton, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the criminal conviction of Sonya Evette Singleton, alleged to have been involved in illicit drug activity and money laundering.