Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2016. And, today a generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar. That means when you give $10 today, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? Please do your part today. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2016.

Your Donation: $

Thursday, August 13, 1998

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Congo Rebellion Grows

    Fighting continues in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Ethnic Tutsi troops who helped President Laurent Kabila topple the former Dictator Mobutu Sese Seko last year, have now challenged Kabila’s leadership. The uprising began in the eastern portion of the Congo after Kabila reportedly ordered the Tutsi troops out of the country. Kabila claims the ethnic troops who are challenging his rule are backed by Uganda and Rwanda. Both countries have denied the charge.

  • U.S. Rocket Explodes

    An Air Force Rocket carrying a classified spy satellite for the Pentagon exploded during liftoff yesterday at Cape Canaveral. It was reportedly carrying a secret satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office with an estimated value at $1 billion. The Titan 4 is the largest unmanned rocket in the United States and has a history of disasters and accidents.

  • N.Y. Hosts Million Youth March

    The Million Youth March is scheduled to take place in New York City early next month. Organizers say they expect between 2-3 million young people from around the country to fill the streets of Harlem. At last report, the City of New York is refusing to grant a permit for the march to take place in Harlem. The lack of cooperation between the two sides has made other civic leaders and elected officials concerned about safety. While other elected officials are concerned that the controversy is overshadowing the message the march is trying to send.