Monday, February 22, 1999

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  • Jasper

    The murder trial of Bill King, a white supremacist accused of dragging an African American man to death, resumes today in Jasper, Texas. A pathologist is expected to detail how James Byrd was chained to a pickup truck and killed. His head and right arm were found separated from the rest of his body.

  • Malcolm X

    Yesterday marked the 34th anniversary of the assassination of Malcolm X, and we play just a few minutes from the documentary "Brother Minister: The Assassination of Malcolm X."

  • Cartagena Bio-Safety Conference

    Representatives from over 100 countries, dozens of environmental organizations and from trade and business organizations around the world have convened in Cartagena, Colombia, for the U.N.-sponsored conference on bio-safety. The international rules guiding the business of bioengineered products will be set here this week.

  • UK Controversy Over Genetically Engineered Foods

    In Britain, an unusual coalition composed of environmental activists, the Conservative Party, the Liberal Democrats, dissidents from the Labor Party and Britain’s Prince Charles are calling for a moratorium on the consumption of genetically engineered foods–which are known there as "Frankenstein foods" or "Frankenfoods." They say that there is not enough research on the health effects of the products for them to be declared safe to eat. Their target—biotech giant Monsanto— main exporter of the foods, as well as Prime Minister Tony Blair, who recently said he believed that gene-altered foods were safe to eat, and added he would "have no hesitation" in eating the products himself. Last week, Greenpeace activists responded to Blair’s comments by dumping four tons of genetically engineered soybeans in front of 10 Downing Street, Blair’s residence.

  • Debate Between Monsanto and Jeremy Rifkin

    Biotech giant Monsanto recently made headlines for its tactics in trying to enforce the patent on its seeds. A recent Washington Post article entitled "Seeds of Discourse" describes the saga of Percy Schemiser, a Canadian farmer who was recently sued by Monsanto in a landmark "seed piracy" case. Schmeiser is one of hundreds of farmers in the United States and Canada who are accused by the biotech giant of replanting the company’s patented seeds in violation of a three-year company rule requiring that farmers buy fresh seeds every year.