Wednesday, March 10, 1999

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Oil and Violence in Colombia

    Rebels from Colombia’s guerrilla group National Liberation Army (ELN) turned over the body yesterday of a French engineer kidnapped in November who apparently died of a heart attack last week while he was being held. Claude Steinmentz was working under contract for oil giant BP-Amoco, and may have died on the same day that three American activists were killed in Northeastern Colombia. Venezuela has said that the bodies of the Americans, Ingrid Washinawatok, Laheena Gay and Terence Freitas, will be flown back to the U.S. today after a few days’ delay. Their bodies were found in Venezuela last Friday close to the border with Colombia.

  • Forty Years of Struggle for Tibetan Autonomy

    On the 40th Anniversary of the Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule in Tibet, the Dalai Lama said that China lacks the political will to seek a compromise on autonomy for his homeland. Speaking in northern India at an event attended by thousands including the likes of actors Richard Gere and Goldie Hawn, the Dalai Lama said that China’s oppression of his people is growing.

  • Fred Phelps and the Anti-Gay Westboro Baptist Church

    Last night, the Covenant Metropolitan Community Church in Birmingham held a vigil for Billy Jack Gaither, a man who was killed by two acquaintances on February 19 who said they beat him to death and burned his body because he was gay. The two, Steven Eric Mullins and Charles Monroe Butler, were arrested and have been charged with open counts of murder. A grand jury has yet to decide the exact charges. This killing mirrored that of Matthew Sheppard last year in Wyoming. Matthew was beaten, tortured, tied to a post and left to die by two men who said that he had made a pass at them.

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour

Stories

    2014-0730_siegman1
    "A Slaughter of Innocents": Henry Siegman, a Venerable Jewish Voice for Peace, on Gaza
    Today, a special with Henry Siegman, the former executive director of the American Jewish Congress, long described as one of the nation’s "big three" Jewish organizations along with the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League. Henry Siegman was born in 1930 in Frankfurt, Germany. Three years later, the Nazis came to power. After fleeing Nazi troops in Belgium, his family eventually moved to the United States. His father was a leader of the European Zionist movement, pushing for the creation of a Jewish state. In...

Headlines

    There are no headlines for this date.