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Wednesday, May 5, 1999

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  • US Admits Error in Bombing of Sudanese Pharmaceutical Plant

    In an admission that last year’s cruise missile attack on a pharmaceutical factory in the Sudan was a mistake, the United States has cleared the man who owned the factory of any charges of terrorism and has unfrozen his assets. The U.S. bombed the factory last August, claiming that it was producing chemical weapons agents. The Sudan maintains that the factory produced only medicine for its population.

  • Lawsuit Against Tony Blair for NATO Bombings

    As NATO continues to bomb Yugoslavia and debates the use of ground troops, a British organization has sued Prime Minister Tony Blair, Foreign Secretary Robin Cook and Defense Secretary George Robertson for serious violations of international humanitarian law in the bombing attacks. The suit, submitted to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, specifically focuses on NATO’s shift from attacking military targets to attacking civilian infrastructure and objects, including power stations and communication links such as roads, tunnels, bridges and railway lines.

  • Media Coverage of Rambouillet

    A divided U.S. Senate yesterday tabled a vote authorizing the Clinton administration to use "all available force" against Yugoslavia, avoiding another mixed message on U.S. intentions in the Balkans. In testimony before the Senate, Oklahoma Senator Don Nickles spoke about Appendix B of the Rambouillet accord, which calls for a NATO invasion of Yugoslavia.

  • The White House Correspondents Dinner

    As bombs rained on Yugoslavia over the weekend, Washington’s elite media clique was toasting its champagne glasses with the likes of Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and the Clintons themselves at the annual White House Correspondents Association dinner.

  • Survivors of East Timor Massacre Speak Out

    With violence sweeping Indonesian-occupied East Timor, the foreign ministers of Indonesia and Portugal plan today to sign an accord that could lead to independence for the former Portuguese colony.

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