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Friday, September 24, 1999

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  • Protests Heat Up in Indonesia

    Protests heated up today in Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital, against a tough new security law that increases the power of the military. Faced with a second day of fierce protests in which the Indonesian military killed three protesters and injured more than 100 others, the regime has been forced to back off, at least for now, from the measure.

  • Asia Society Hosts Burma’s Military Junta, Bars Activists From Attending

    The Asia Society, a corporate sponsored group purporting to have an interest in Asian culture, is hosting a speech in New York today by Wing Aung, the Foreign Minister for Burma’s military junta. Over 1,500 political prisoners languish in Burma’s jails under the country’s repressive regime, which boasts the dubious title of holding the youngest prisoner of conscience–a three year old boy.

  • Should the United States Intervene in Colombia?

    Beset by a stalled peace process and by levels of violence that have resulted in the displacement of over one million people, Colombian President Andres Pastrana was in Washington this week seeking billions of dollars in economic and military assistance. The United States is already giving Colombia $289 million in anti-drug money this year–and it is considering an addition $1 billion, which would make Colombia the number three foreign military aid recipient, after Israel and Egypt.