Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If everyone who visited our website in the next week donated just $15, we would cover all of our operating costs for the year. We can't do it without you. Please donate today. It takes just a couple of minutes to do your part to make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $

Tuesday, April 18, 2000

download:   Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Voices From the World Bank and IMF Protests

    Police fired tear gas and pepper spray at hundreds of demonstrators yesterday, arresting nearly 600 who came out to shut down the final day of meetings at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank — organizations they say pursue policies that increase poverty, harm the environment and ravage the economies of developing countries in the name of globalization. After three days of civil disobedience actions, more than 1,100 protesters, ranging from animal activists to human rights advocates, have been arrested.

  • Training the Protesters and Monitoring Police Conduct

    This week’s Mobilization for Global Justice in Washington, D.C. was more highly integrated than the protests in Seattle. This was due to the work of the Ruckus Society, an organization that trains people to use non-violent confrontation in their campaign work. The group put their consensus-based, decentralized organization structure to use at the WTO protests in Seattle last November, and this week at the IMF and World Bank meetings in Washington. The D.C. police recently raided the Ruckus Society’s convergence space, confiscating the group’s training materials and medical supplies, and citing them with bogus fire violations.

  • Oronto Douglas

    Democracy Now! was the first to document the oil giant Chevron’s role in the killing of two Nigerian activists. The San Francisco-based oil company helped facilitate an attack by the feared Nigerian Navy and notorious Mobile Police (MOPOL).

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour