Friday, February 9, 2001

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  • Columbia Journalism School Decision to Let Gore Teach Off the Record

    On Tuesday, when Al Gore gave his first lecture as a part-time journalism teacher at Columbia University, his studentswere under a gag order. They were told that the class taught by the former vice president and presidential candidatewas off the record.

  • Clinton Put on the Record

    Journalists who don’t play by the rules often don’t get access to the most powerful people. At press conferences their raised hands are ignored. Their phone calls are not returned. Their queries are handled by low-level assistants. But sometimes top politicians and business leaders who talk only under the managed conditions and grant interviews only to the journalists they know are caught in the headlights of a free press. One such instance occurred before the 2000 elections. President Clinton went on the record and answered questions on substantive issues, when all he intended to do was make a packaged get-out-the-vote statement. [includes rush transcript]

  • How the New York Times Frames Youth

    Despite a 33% drop in juvenile crime since 1993, two thirds of the American public believe that juvenile crime is onthe rise. Youth face zero tolerance policies in courtrooms, classrooms, neighborhoods, and prisons. Between 1992 and1997, some 47 states enacted laws making it easier to transfer youth from the juvenile justice system to the criminaljustice system. School boards brought police departments into the schools. And in the streets, youth, and especiallyyouth of color, face fear from civilians and harassment and violence from police.