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Friday, March 15, 2002

  • Milosevic Cross-Examines NATO Leader at Hague

    Guest:

  • Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe: Demon Or Demonized?

    In Zimbabwe incumbent President Robert Mugabe has been declared the winner in last weekend’s presidential elections.This week, the headlines in the corporate media in the US and Western Europe were awash with condemnations of theelections. Headlines like "Zimbabwe’s Stolen Vote" "Mugabe’s False Victory" and "Washington Doesn’t RecognizeZimbabwe Election Results." But despite the headlines in the western press, many of the election observers fromAfrican nations say the election result is legitimate. An observer team from the Organization of African Unity calledthe poll "transparent, credible, free and fair." Namibia called the election "watertight, without room for rigging,"and Nigerian observers said they had seen nothing that threatened the integrity of the poll.

  • Ralph Nader: A Democracy Now! Interview About Fuel Efficiency, Anthrax, Afghanistan,Healthcare, and the Corporate Elite

    The Senate stood by the high-powered vehicles of suburbia this week and refused to impose tougher fuel economystandards. Instead, they voted overwhelmingly for a much weaker provision supported by the auto industry.