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Friday, March 22, 2002

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  • Stunning Depths of Government Collaboration with Enron Revealed

    We are going to begin with a Democracy Now! exclusive. The Institute for Policy Studies in Washington DC today willrelease an explosive new report saying that Enron Corp. was able to become a global giant only because governmentagencies, both American and foreign, gave it more than $7 billion in publicly funded financing over the past decade.The report is called "Enron’s Pawns: How Public Institutions Bankrolled Enron’s Globalization Game." The reportbegins:

    “Many public officials have described Enron’s demise as the product of corporate misbehavior. This perspectiveignores a vital fact: Enron would not have scaled such grand global heights, nor fallen so dramatically, without itsclose financial relationships with government agencies. Since 1992, at least 21 agencies, representing the U.S.government, multilateral development banks, and other national governments, helped leverage Enron’s global reach byapproving $7.219 billion in public financing toward 38 projects in 29 countries. For example:

  • The Hollywood Film "John Q" Takes On the Health Insurance Industry

    The Oscars are this Sunday. In 74 years of the Oscars, the most prestigious movie awards, only six acting trophieshave gone to African-Americans. But this year, much is being made about it being a good year for African Americans.The honorary Oscar will go to Sidney Poitier for his life’s work. 38 years ago, Poitier won best actor for Lilies ofthe Field. This year is the first time African-American performers could win both major acting categories. HalleBerry is up for best actress in Monster’s Ball and Denzel Washington for best actor in Training Day.

  • An Oscar Nominated Film, "Promises", Looks at Israel and Palestine Through the Eyes Ofchildren

    Israelis and Palestinians resumed truce talks today, despite two recent Palestinian suicide attacks, including onethat killed three Israelis yesterday. The attacks initially prompted Israel to walk out on the talks, and sparked asharp rebuke from President Bush.