Thursday, December 4, 2003

  • As Sentencing in the Lackawanna 6 Case Begins, A U.S. Court Rejects Law That Criminalizes Unknowingly Supporting a Terrorist Organization

    Lackawanna

    The federal law that criminalizes providing "material support" to terrorist organizations was in the spotlight yesterday. In Buffalo, sentencing began for six Yemeni-American men, known as the "Lackawanna Six," who traveled to Afghanistan before 9/11 and attended an Al Qaeda training camp. In San Francisco, a federal court ruled parts of the law unconstitutional. We talk to attorney David Cole.

  • Tariq Ali vs. Christopher Hitchens on the Occupation of Iraq: Postponed Liberation or Recolonisation?

    Alihitchins

    It has been 8 months since the U.S. began its invasion of Iraq. In this time, U.S. forces have failed to produce any weapons of mass destruction in the country˜the stated reason for going to war against Baghdad.

    According to the Pentagon’s own figures, some 440 U.S. troops have died in Iraq. Thousands have been wounded. There are no solid estimates of the number of Iraqis who have been killed since the start of the invasion. November was the bloodiest month for U.S. forces in Iraq 79 soldiers died, 39 of them were killed in the downing of 4 military helicopters. Saddam Hussein remains at-large and the occupation forces face regular attacks throughout the country.

    Today, we take a look at the U.S. occupation of Iraq with two renowned authors: Tariq Ali, author of Bush in Babylon: The Recolonization of Iraq and Christopher Hitchens, jounalist and author of A Long Short War: The Postponed Liberation of Iraq.

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