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Monday, March 8, 2004

  • EXCLUSIVE:
    ARISTIDE SPEAKS TO DEMOCRACY NOW! IN MOST EXTENSIVE ENGLISH-LANGUAGE INTERVIEW SINCE HIS REMOVAL FROM HAITI

    At approximately 7:20 am EST, Democracy Now! managed to reach exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide by cell phone in the Central African Republic. His comments represent the most extensive English-language interview Aristide has given since he was removed from office and his country.

    Moments before the Democracy Now! interview, Aristide appeared publicly for the first time since he was forced out of Haiti in what he has called a US-backed coup. The authorities in the Central African Republic allowed Aristide to hold a news conference after a delegation of visiting US activists charged that the Haitian president was being held under lock and key like a prisoner. The delegation included one of Aristide’s lawyers, Brian Concannon, as well as activists from the Haiti Support Network and the International Action Center, representatives of former US Attorney General Ramsey Clark. Shortly after they arrived in Bangui on Sunday, the delegation attempted to meet with Aristide at the palace of the Renaissance. The CAR government rebuked them.

    WEB EXCLUSIVE: Click here to listen to report from delegation member Sara Flounders

    Shortly after, the country’s foreign minister held a press conference in Bangui. Armed men threatened journalists in the room, warning them not to record the minister’s remarks. Mildred Aristide, the Haitian First lady, was brought into the room, but was not permitted to speak. The CAR foreign minister told the journalists that President Aristide would hold a news conference within 72 hours. Hours later, Aristide was allowed to address journalists.

    In his interview on Democracy Now!, Aristide asserted that he is the legitimate president of Haiti and that he wants to return to the country as soon as possible. He details his last moments in Haiti, describing what he called his "kidnapping" and the coup d’etat against him. He responds to Vice President Dick Cheney’s comment that Aristide had "worn out his welcome" in Haiti.

    Developing....

  • Bushwomen Pt I: A Look At The Women in Bush’s Cabinet and Inner Circle

    Flandersl

    In the first of a two-part series, we speak with "Your Call" radio host Laura Flanders about her new book "Bushwomen: Tales of a Cynical Species" which tells the story of six women appointed to the inner circle of President Bush’s cabinet and sub-cabinet: Condoleezza Rice, Elaine Chao, Christine Todd Whitman, Ann Veneman, Gale Ann Norton and Karen Hughes. [includes transcript]

  • Former Nader Running-mate Defends Nader’s 2004 Presidential Bid, Discusses International Women’s Day, Racism and Alternative Energy

    Laduke

    On this International Women’s Day we speak with Winona LaDuke, a longtime indigenous rights activist about the "Wind Not War" alternative energy campaign, racism towards Native Americans and protests against President Bush to mark International Women’s Day. [includes transcript]

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