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Thursday, March 31, 2005

  • John Bolton In His Own Words: Bush’s UN Ambassador Nominee Condemns United Nations

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    Democracy Now! airs rare footage of John Bolton speaking on Feb. 3, 1994 in New York criticizing the United Nations. "The Secretariat building in New York has 38 stories," Bolton said. "If it lost ten stories, it wouldn’t make a bit of difference." Meanwhile, 59 former diplomats have written an open letter criticizing his nomination. [includes rush transcript]

  • Ex-Bush Official Warns the Administration: Don’t Rush on the Road to Damascus

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    We talk to Flynt Leverett who served as President Bush’s senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council from March 2002 to March 2003. [includes rush transcript]

  • Nat Hentoff: Terri Schiavo Suffered From "Longest Public Execution in American History."

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    Village Voice columnist Nat Hentoff and law professor Jamin Raskin discuss the case of Terri Schiavo, who died today (shortly after we went off the air). Two weeks ago courts order the removal of the feeding tube of the brain-damaged woman sparking a national debate. In a new column Hentoff wrote, "For all the world to see, a 41-year-old woman, who has committed no crime, will die of dehydration and starvation in the longest public execution in American history." [includes rush transcript]

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