Wednesday, January 17, 2007

  • Wrongly Accused Ex-Gitmo Chaplain and Spy Target James Yee Speaks Out on Newly Revealed Pentagon Surveillance


    The New York Times recently revealed that the Pentagon and CIA were secretly examining the financial assets and transactions of thousands of American citizens without court approval by issuing national security letters. We speak to the Center for National Security Studies’ Lisa Graves and one of the program’s most prominent targets, James Yee, the former Muslim Guantanamo Bay chaplain wrongly accused of espionage. [includes rush transcript]

  • As CIA Leak Trial Begins, Inside the Case Against Ex-Cheney Chief of Staff Lewis "Scooter" Libby


    Jury selection for the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff has begun. Lewis "Scooter" Libby faces five counts of lying to federal investigators, perjury and obstruction of justice. He is accused of lying to investigators and a grand jury during the investigation of the outing of CIA operative Valerie Plame. We speak with veteran investigative journalist Murray Waas. [includes rush transcript]

  • Top Pentagon Official Calls for Boycott of Law Firms Representing Guantanamo Prisoners


    A top Pentagon official last week urged U.S. corporations to boycott law firms whose attorneys represent detainees at the U.S. prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In a radio interview last week, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs Charles "Cully" Stimson said companies might wish to shun firms that represent "the very terrorists who hit their bottom line back in 2001." Stimson apologized after his remarks were condemned by the American Bar Association and deans from more than 130 law schools. We speak with the co-author of the law school petition and a corporate lawyer representing six Guantanamo prisoners. [includes rush transcript]

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    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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