Friday, October 10, 2008

  • As Stocks Plummet Across the Globe, Bush to Host Emergency Finance Meeting at White House


    In the largest loss since the crash of 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell over seven percent on Thursday, closing below 9,000 for the first time in five years. Over the past six trading days, the Dow has plummeted over 2,200 points, or about 21 percent. Earlier today, global stock values fell in trading as fears grow of a worldwide recession. [includes rush transcript]

  • US Lifts Ban on Nuclear Trade with India


    President Bush has signed legislation to lift a three-decade ban on nuclear trade with India. The deal will allow India to expand its nuclear power industry without requiring it to sign the Non-Proliferation Treaty as other nations must. Critics say the agreement encourages nuclear production worldwide, because it effectively rewards India for developing nukes outside the treaty. We speak to Achin Vanaik, professor at Delhi University. [includes rush transcript]

  • APA Approves Measure Banning Psychologists from Interrogations


    The American Psychological Association has approved a landmark measure banning members from taking part in interrogations of prisoners held in Guantanamo Bay. We speak to Dan Aalbers, member of the dissident APA group called the Coalition for an Ethical Psychology. [includes rush transcript]

  • “Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery”


    The latest official count of US servicemembers who have died in the Iraq war is 4,180; in Afghanistan, 610. At Arlington National Cemetery, the nation’s preeminent military cemetery, Iraq and Afghanistan veterans are buried in Section 60. A new documentary film follows some of the families that come to visit their graves. [includes rush transcript]

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Full News Hour


    Juan González on How Puerto Rico’s Economic "Death Spiral" is Tied to Legacy of Colonialism
    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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