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Wednesday, April 22, 2009

  • A Town Suffering for Generations: Decades of Asbestos Exposure by W.R. Grace Mine Leave Hundreds Dead, 1,200+ Sickened in Libby

    Gayla-fam-double

    We broadcast from Missoula, Montana, where an environmental crimes trial is underway in what the government has called "the nation’s biggest environmental disaster." Hundreds of miners, their family members and townsfolk have died, and at least 1,200 have been sickened, from exposure to asbestos-containing ore from a mine in Libby, Montana, owned by W.R. Grace and Company. We speak with Gayla Benefield, one of the first residents in Libby to raise awareness about the story and gain it national attention. Both her parents died from asbestosis. She and her husband both have the disease, and thirty members of her extended family have been affected. [includes rush transcript]

  • Environmental Crimes Trial Underway Against W.R. Grace for Widespread Asbestos Exposure in Montana Town

    Danger-web

    Government prosecutors called their final witness on Monday in their case against W.R. Grace and Company. The firm and five former executives are charged with knowingly exposing their workers and the public to vermiculite ore contaminated with asbestos from the company’s mine in Libby, Montana. The government has called it "the nation’s biggest environmental disaster." Hundreds died as a result. W.R. Grace knew from the time it bought the mine in 1963 why the people in Libby were dying. But for the thirty years it owned the mine, the company did not stop it. We speak with two reporters covering the story. [includes rush transcript]