Friday, August 14, 2009

  • Exclusive: Youssef Megahed Speaks Out from Prison; Florida Student Was Acquitted in Jury Trial But Now Faces Deportation on Same Charges


    Florida student Youssef Megahed was arrested by federal immigration agents in April just three days after a jury acquitted him on federal explosives charges. He now faces deportation on the same charges. But this time, he won’t be tried by a jury of his peers, but by an immigration judge. Youssef Megahed speaks to us from prison in a Democracy Now! exclusive. [includes rush transcript]

  • Juror in Megahed’s Federal Trial Joins Voices Speaking Out for His Release


    Three days before Youssef Megahed’s immigration trial, his father, mother, sister and two brothers are being granted US citizenship. We speak to Youssef’s father, Samir Megahed; his immigration lawyer, Charles Kuck; and Gary Meringer, a juror in the criminal trial against Megahed who is speaking out in his support. After Megahed’s re-arrest, Meringer and three other jurors issued a statement saying, "It strikes us as fundamentally wrong that the government has put Mr. Megahed back in jail for suspicion of the same activities that he was acquitted of in the criminal case." [includes rush transcript]

  • "You Do Not Cut Deals with the System that Has to Be Replaced": Ralph Nader on Secret White House Agreements with the Drug Industry


    The Obama administration admitted last week it promised to oppose proposals to let the government negotiate drug prices and extract additional savings from drug companies. In return, drug companies reportedly pledged to reduce costs by up to $80 billion. The White House has tried to back off the reported agreements, but the drug industry says it expects the White House to uphold its pledge. We speak to former presidential candidate and longtime consumer advocate Ralph Nader. [includes rush transcript]

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Full News Hour


    Juan González on How Puerto Rico’s Economic "Death Spiral" is Tied to Legacy of Colonialism
    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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