Monday, August 24, 2009

  • Newsweek: Inspector General Report Reveals CIA Conducted Mock Executions


    The Justice Department is scheduled today to disclose a long-suppressed 2004 report by the CIA’s inspector general detailing prisoner abuse. Among the findings are that CIA interrogators staged mock executions on prisoners. The report also describes how one detainee was threatened with a handgun and an electric power drill during the course of CIA interrogation. Newsweek magazine first reported details from the report on its website on Friday night. We speak with Michael Isikoff, investigative correspondent for Newsweek. [includes rush transcript]

  • Youssef Megahed Freed After Immigration Judge Throws Out Government’s Deportation Case


    A Florida immigration judge on Friday dismissed the government’s deportation case against Youssef Megahed and released him from the detention center in South Florida where he had spent the last four months. Youssef was arrested by federal immigration agents outside a Wal-Mart in Tampa this April, just three days after a jury acquitted him on federal explosives charges. We speak to Youssef in his first extended broadcast interview since his release and with his attorney, Charles Kuck. [includes rush transcript]

  • Imprisoned Native American Activist Leonard Peltier Again Denied Parole


    The imprisoned Native American activist Leonard Peltier has been denied parole again. The US Parole Commission told the sixty-four-year-old Peltier on Friday that his release would "depreciate the seriousness of [his] offenses" and "promote disrespect for the law." It was Peltier’s first full parole hearing in fifteen years, and he will not be eligible for parole again until July 2024, at the age of seventy-nine. We speak with Eric Seitz, Leonard Peltier’s attorney. [includes rush transcript]

  • Calley Apologizes for 1968 My Lai Massacre


    Over forty-one years after the My Lai Massacre, when US troops killed more than 500 men, women and children in Vietnam, the former Army lieutenant who was convicted for his role in the killings has publicly apologized. William Calley was the only US soldier held legally responsible for the slayings. He was convicted on twenty-two counts of murder, and his sentence was later commuted by President Reagan. Last week, William Calley publicly apologized for the first time, saying, “There is not a day that goes by that I do not feel remorse for what happened that day in My Lai." He added that he had been following orders. [includes rush transcript]

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Full News Hour


    Juan González on How Puerto Rico’s Economic "Death Spiral" is Tied to Legacy of Colonialism
    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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