Monday, July 12, 2010

  • Democracy Now! in Port-au-Prince: Patrick Elie on Haiti Six Months After the Earthquake

    Elieweb

    Haiti remains a nation in ruins six months after one of the world’s worst natural disasters killed more than 300,000 people. Thousands of bodies still lay under rubble. We begin today’s show in Port-au-Prince outside what remains of the Montana Hotel, where some 200 people died in the earthquake. We speak to Patrick Elie, a longtime Haitian democracy activist and Haiti’s former Secretary of State for Public Security.
    "We are a people who can fend for ourselves," Elie said. "We have a vision of where we want to go. So we do need friends, but we don’t need people to think for us or to pity us. And that’s probably this attitude that’s playing a part in the aid not being forthcoming." [includes rush transcript]

  • Beverly Bell: There Is No Plan for Permanently Housing the 1.9 Million Haitians Who Lost Their Homes in the Quake

    Bellweb

    "People are living in ravines. They are living on sidewalks, jammed up against other houses," says Beverly Bell of the group Other Worlds. "They are creating structures out of any temporary material they can find, a lot of them no more than four sticks and bed sheets." Bell also talks about how the international reconstruction plan for Haiti revolves around the creation of four new free enterprise zones, which will expand the number of sweatshop factories in Haiti. [includes rush transcript]

  • Displaced Haitians: "We Can’t Continue in This Situation Anymore"

    Campweb1

    We visited Camp Corail, one of the hundreds of camps for displaced people in Haiti. We spoke to two displaced Haitians, Romain Arius and Fenel Domercant. They talked about how little aid has trickled down to the 1,300 families in the camp. They were told they would only be in the camp for three months, but long after the deadline they continue to wait for permanent housing. [includes rush transcript]

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