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Friday, August 20, 2010

  • Obama Admin Claims End to Combat Operations in Iraq, But Iraqis See Same War Under a Different Name

    Troopwithdrawl

    The Obama administration says the last combat brigades have left Iraq. Is this the end of the Iraq war or just a rebranding of the US occupation? More than 50,000 troops remain in Iraq as well as 4,500 special operations forces and tens of thousands of private contractors. The US embassy in Baghdad is the largest in the world — the size of eighty football fields. We get a perspective on the so-called withdrawal rarely heard in the US media: that of two Iraqis, Raed Jarrar of Peace Action and Yanar Mohammed of the Organization of Women’s Freedom in Iraq. [includes rush transcript]

  • Iraq War Vet Camilo Mejía: US Withdrawal Plan Marks "Privatization of Military Occupation"

    Mejia_troopwithdrawl

    Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejía, the first US combat veteran to publicly resist the war, joins us to give his reaction to the so-called US withdrawal of combat troops from Iraq. Mejía served six months in Iraq in 2003 with the Florida National Guard. While on a two-week leave in the United States, he decided never to return. In May 2004, a military jury convicted him of desertion, and he was sentenced to one year in prison. He served nine months behind bars, prompting Amnesty International to declare him a prisoner of conscience. [includes rush transcript]

  • Debate: Is DREAM Act a Solution for Millions of Undocumented Youth or a Funnel for Military Recruitment?

    Dreamact2

    The Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act — DREAM — would allow undocumented young people a chance at citizenship provided they attend college for at least two years or enlist in the military. It’s been described as a dream come true for undocumented youth wanting a chance to stay in this country without the fear of deportation. But many antiwar activists warn that the bill will simply funnel more young people into the military. We host a debate between Camilo Mejía of Iraq Veterans Against the War and pro-DREAM activist Gaby Pacheco. [includes rush transcript]

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