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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

  • "A Departure to Be Welcomed": Robert Scheer on Resignation of White House Economic Adviser and Deregulation Proponent Lawrence Summers

    Larry-summers

    The makeup of President Obama’s economic team is being shaken up some more as Lawrence Summers has announced he is resigning as director of the National Economic Council later this year to return to Harvard University. According to Bloomberg News, the White House is considering naming a "prominent corporate executive" to replace Summers in order to counter Wall Street criticism that the administration is "anti-business." We speak to veteran journalist Robert Scheer, author of The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street. [includes rush transcript]

  • Chilean Economist Manfred Max-Neef: US Is Becoming an "Underdeveloping Nation"

    Maxneef

    While President Obama is reporting looking into tapping a former corporate executive to become his next top economic adviser, many economists question the path the United States is on. We speak to the acclaimed Chilean economist Manfred Max-Neef. He won the Right Livelihood Award in 1983, two years after the publication of his book Outside Looking In: Experiences in Barefoot Economics. [includes rush transcript]

  • As Competing Films Offer Differing Views on Faulkner Killing, New Evidence Suggests Key Witnesses Lied at Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Trial

    Mumia

    In the early morning hours of December 9, 1981, Daniel Faulkner, a white police officer, was fatally shot in the streets of Philadelphia. Journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal was arrested and charged with his murder. The following summer a predominantly white jury sentenced him to death. Twenty-eight years later, the debate is still raging over whether justice was served. The debate spilled onto the silver screen in Philadelphia Tuesday night, with two new films premiering at the same time, each with competing explanations of what happened the night Faulkner was killed and during Mumia Abu-Jamal’s trial for his murder. [includes rush transcript]

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