Thursday, March 8, 2012

  • Nada Bakri, Widow of Anthony Shadid, on Her Husband’s Life and Posthumous Memoir, "House of Stone"

    Nada%20and%20anthony

    We speak with Nada Bakri, the widow of Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Anthony Shadid, about her husband’s passion for covering the Middle East and his posthumous memoir. "House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East" chronicles Shadid’s rebuilding of his family’s ancestral home in Lebanon. "He felt like [the Arab Spring] is a dream come true for every journalist covering the Middle East," Bakri says. "After covering it for so many years—oppression and dictatorships and wars and conflicts and violence—finally something is changing, and something positive and optimistic." Bakri is a Lebanese-born journalist who also writes for the New York Times. [includes rush transcript]

  • Women Fight Back as Virginia, Georgia Curb Reproductive Rights: "When We’re Screwed, We Multiply"

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    On International Women’s Day, we speak with Loretta Ross of the SisterSong Reproductive Justice Collective about the latest wave of legislative attacks on reproductive rights. Virginia has enacted a controversial law forcing women seeking abortions to have an ultrasound. Lawmakers in Georgia and New Hampshire, meanwhile, have advanced new curbs on abortion and contraception coverage. Georgia lawmakers are also considering a bill that would ban abortion after 20 weeks based on the highly contested notion that fetuses can feel pain at that stage. "In Georgia we got tossed back to the 19th century," Ross says. "Republican legislators really didn’t want to hear from women, they didn’t want to pay attention, and presumed that they could tell us what to do with our bodies again." [includes rush transcript]

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