Tuesday, October 22, 2013

  • Deadly 911 Calls: NYPD Kills African Immigrant Student Inside Home After Mother Calls for Ambulance

    Mrs._bah

    As the October 22nd Coalition to Stop Police Brutality, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation holds protests in several cities today, we bring you the shocking story of Mohamed Bah, a 28-year-old college student from the African nation of Guinea. He was shot dead by New York City police officers on September 25, 2012. Police arrived at Mohamed Bah’s apartment after his mother, Hawa Bah, called 911 because she thought he was depressed, and wanted an ambulance to take him to the hospital. Police claimed he lunged at officers with a knife. But many questions remain unanswered. We are joined by Hawa and her attorneys, Mayo Bartlett and Randolph McLaughlin, both longtime civil rights attorneys.

    Click here to watch part 2 of this segment about a similar case involving the police murder of a bipolar Puerto Rican artist whose wife called 911 for medical help.

  • Deadly 911 Calls Pt. 2: Police Kill Bipolar Puerto Rican Artist After Concerned Wife Calls for Help

    Mrs_cruz

    On May 26, Elsa Cruz called 911 because she was worried her husband, Samuel Cruz, had stopped taking his medication for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Police from New Rochelle, New York, soon arrived. By the time they had left, Cruz had been shot dead. Police claimed he lunged at officers with a knife. Cruz was a 48-year-old artist from Puerto Rico. The Cruz family is filing a lawsuit against the New Rochelle Police Department today. We speak to Elsa and her attorneys, Mayo Bartlett and Randolph McLaughlin, both longtime civil rights attorneys.

    Click here to watch part 1 of this segment about the case of Mohamed Bah, who was killed by New York City police after his mother called 911 for medical help.

  • Memphis Model: Police Pioneer Use of Crisis Intervention Teams to Deal with Mentally Sick

    Memphis_police_car

    The civil rights lawsuits filed by the families of Samuel Cruz and Mohamed Bah, both murdered by police after family members called 911 for medical assistance, include a call to train police how to handle crisis intervention and how to respond to calls for help with people who are emotionally disturbed. Unlike the 2,500 communities in over 40 states, New York City and New Rochelle police do not have crisis intervention teams designed by mental health professionals. Many of these so-called CITs are based on what has become known as the "Memphis Model," a policy developed there after an officer killed a mentally ill person in 1987. We’re joined by Sam Cochran, retired police officer who served as the coordinator of the Memphis Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Team for 20 years, from 1988 to 2008. He is now project coordinator with the University of Memphis’s CIT Center, where he is nationally known for his work.

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