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Friday, December 6, 2013

  • Remembering Nelson Mandela: From Freedom Fighter to Political Prisoner to South African President

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    Former South African president and anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela has died at the age of 95. South African President Jacob Zuma announced Mandela’s death Thursday saying, "Our nation has lost its greatest son. Our people have lost their father." Mandela was held as a political prisoner for 27 years from 1962 to 1990. In 1994, four years after his release from prison, Mandela became South Africa’s first black president. We air highlights of Mandela in his own words over the years, including a rare TV interview from the early 1960s.

    Click here to watch our special coverage of the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

  • Randall Robinson on Nelson Mandela, U.S. Backing of Apartheid Regime & Success of Sanctions Movement

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    In 1964, Nelson Mandela was sentenced to life in prison on Robben Island. He would become the most famous political prisoner in the world and his freedom became a central demand of the international anti-apartheid movement. Despite growing international pressure in the 1980s, the apartheid government received strong backing from the Reagan administration and Margaret Thatcher in Britain. The African National Congress was considered a terrorist organization by both nations. Mandela was listed on the U.S. terrorist watch list until 2008. We speak to Randall Robinson, founder and past president of TransAfrica. He helped found the Free South Africa Movement and was arrested many times during the 1980s protesting the apartheid regime.

    Click here to watch our special coverage of the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

  • Soweto Activist: While Mandela Helped Build "The New South Africa," Struggle Continues for Many

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    Residents of Soweto began morning outside the former home of Nelson Mandela soon after his death was announced. We go to South Africa to speak with the Soweto-based activist Trevor Ngwane. He reflects on Mandela’s historic legacy but also talks about some of the failings of the new South Africa. For many South Africans, the fight for social and economic justice has not ended.

    Click here to watch our special coverage of the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

  • Filmmaker Danny Schechter: The Anti-Apartheid Movement Behind Mandela Can’t Be Forgotten

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    We speak to documentary filmmaker Danny Schechter and Father Michael Lapsley in Cape Town. Schechter has made six nonfiction films on Mandela, including "Mandela in America." He began working in South Africa in the 1960s. He is author of the new book, "Madiba A to Z: The Many Faces of Nelson Mandela," which was published in conjunction with the new film, "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom." We also speak with Father Michael Lapsley, who lost his two hands in a mail bomb assassination attempt in April 1990, two months after Nelson Mandela was released. He is now the director of the Institute for Healing of Memories.

    Click here to watch our special coverage of the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

    Watch part 2 of this interview.