Thursday, July 11, 2013

  • Rep. Luis Gutiérrez: House GOP Obstruction Won’t Stop Momentum of Immigration Reform

    Rep._luis_gutrierrez

    The push to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill this year faced a major setback Wednesday after House Republicans gathered behind closed doors to discuss whether they would support a bill passed just last month in the Senate. House Speaker John Boehner emerged from the meeting to reject what he called the Senate’s "flawed legislation." We’re joined by Democratic Rep. Luis Gutiérrez of Illinois, chair of the Immigration Task Force of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and member of the bipartisan House panel working on a broad immigration reform bill. In an upcoming tour, Rep. Gutiérrez will visit Republican congressional districts to build bipartisan support for immigration reform. "The movement is broad, the movement is very deep, and it will not be denied," Rep. Gutierrez says. "You can delay this, but you cannot stop it. It is inevitable. In the end, all Boehner has to do is give us a vote."

  • Jailed Journalist Barrett Brown Faces 105 Years For Reporting on Hacked Private Intelligence Firms

    Barrett_brown2

    Journalist Barrett Brown spent his 300th day behind bars this week on a range of charges filed after he used information obtained by the hacker group Anonymous to report on the operations of private intelligence firms. Brown faces 17 charges ranging from threatening an FBI agent to credit card fraud for posting a link online to a document that contained stolen credit card data. But according to his supporters, Brown is being unfairly targeted for daring to investigate the highly secretive world of private intelligence and military contractors. Using information Anonymous took from the firm HBGary Federal, Brown helped discover a secret plan to tarnish the reputations of WikiLeaks and journalist Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian. Brown similarly analyzed and wrote about the millions of internal company emails from Stratfor Global Intelligence that were leaked in 2011. We speak to Peter Ludlow, professor of philosophy at Northwestern University, whose article "The Strange Case of Barrett Brown" recently appeared in The Nation. "Considering that the person who carried out the actual Stratfor hack had several priors and is facing a maximum of 10 years, the inescapable conclusion is that the problem is not with the hack itself but with Brown’s journalism," Ludlow argues. He adds that the case against Brown could suggest criminality "to even link to something or share a link with someone."