Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $

Friday, August 9, 2013

  • Son of Victim in Sikh Temple Attack Unites with Former White Supremacist to Fight Violence and Hate

    Serve2uniteguest1

    This week marks the one-year anniversary of the attack by neo-Nazi gunman Wade Michael Page on a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, that left six dead and five wounded. We speak with two guests whose unlikely alliance was born out of this tragedy: Pardeep Kaleka, the son of the former temple president, Satwant Singh Kaleka, who was killed in the attack; and Arno Michaelis, a former white supremacist and author of "My Life After Hate." Kaleka is founder of Serve 2 Unite, and Michaelis is an educator with the group, which works to educate young people to take a stand against violence and hate. "Beyond interrupting the cycle of violence, the motivation for doing that is the essence of taking ownership of the violence in our society," Michaelis says. "That blood is on all of our hands; it’s all of our problem, and we all need to be part of the solution."

  • Onondaga Leader Oren Lyons, Pete Seeger on International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

    Canoejourney1

    Hundreds of Native Americans and their allies arrive in New York City today after paddling more than a hundred miles down the Hudson River to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the first treaty between Native Americans and the Europeans who traveled here. The event is part of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, first proclaimed by the United Nations 20 years ago. We speak with Oren Lyons, faithkeeper of the Onondaga Nation who helped establish the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Peoples in 1982. "We’re concerned about the future, we’re concerned about the Earth — seven generations hence — and the conduct of people," Oren says. "We wonder, how do you instruct seven billion people as to the relationship to the Earth? Because unless they understand that, and relate the way they should be, the future is pretty dim for the human species." We are also joined by one of their supporters, Pete Seeger, the legendary folk singer, banjo player, storyteller, and activist; and by Andy Mager, project coordinator for the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign and a member of Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation.

    Watch parts 2 and 3 of this interview:
    Pete Seeger Remembers His Late Wife Toshi, Sings Civil Rights Anthem 'We Shall Overcome'

    Pete Seeger & Onondaga Leader Oren Lyons on Fracking, Indigenous Struggles and Hiroshima Bombing

  • Pete Seeger Remembers His Late Wife Toshi, Sings Civil Rights Anthem "We Shall Overcome"

    Peteseeger1

    We continue our conversation with the legendary Pete Seeger here in our New York studio. Born in 1919, the 94-year-old Seeger is an American icon. In the 1940s, he performed in The Weavers, along with Woody Guthrie. In the 1950s, he opposed Senator Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunt and was almost jailed for refusing to answer questions before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Seeger helped popularize the civil rights anthem, "We Shall Overcome." In the 1960s, he was a vocal critic of the Vietnam War and inspired a generation of protest singers. He was later at the center of the environmental and anti-nuclear movements. A month ago today, on July 9, his wife, the artist and filmmaker Toshi Seeger, died at the age of 91. She was a key leader and artistic programmer for the Great Hudson River Revival, the annual fundraiser for the Clearwater organization that helped to clean up the Hudson River in New York. She died less than two weeks short of what would have been the Seegers’ 70th wedding anniversary.

    Watch parts 1 and 3 of this interview:
    Onondaga Leader Oren Lyons, Pete Seeger on International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

    Pete Seeger & Onondaga Leader Oren Lyons on Fracking, Indigenous Struggles and Hiroshima Bombing

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour

Stories