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Monday, September 16, 2013

  • Could Russia-U.S. Deal on Syria Chemical Weapons Lead to a Non-Imperial, New Internationalism?

    Kerrylarov2

    The United States, France and Britain have agreed to seek a "strong and robust" U.N. resolution that sets precise and binding deadlines on removal of chemical weapons in Syria. The announcement comes two days after the United States and Russia brokered a deal for Syria to surrender its full chemical weapons arsenal by mid-2014. We speak to The Nation’s Katrina vanden Heuvel, who has covered Russia for years, and Boston University Professor Andrew Bacevich, author of "Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country."

  • Andrew Bacevich on "Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country"

    Barry1

    In his new book, "Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country," Andrew Bacevich looks at the growing gulf between America’s soldiers and the society that sends them off to war. Bacevich served in the U.S. Army for 23 years and retired at the rank of colonel. He is now a professor of history and international relations at Boston University. His son, Andrew, died in the Iraq War. "Now that the war in Iraq has ended," Bacevich writes, "Americans might ponder the question of what the loss of several thousand soldiers there signifies. I have grappled with that question myself, not altogether successfully."

  • "Terrorism is Part of Our History": Angela Davis on ’63 Church Bombing, Growing up in "Bombingham"

    Birmingham-bombing

    Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. On Sept. 15, 1963, a dynamite blast planted by the Ku Klux Klan killed four young girls in the church: Denise McNair, age 11, and Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley and Addie Mae Collins, all 14 years old. Twenty other people were injured. No one was arrested for the bombings for 14 years. We hear an address by world-renowned author, activist and scholar Angela Davis, professor emerita at University of California, Santa Cruz. She spoke last night in Oakland, California, at an event organized by the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University School of Law.