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Tuesday, August 26, 2014

  • "There Will Be Justice": Mourners Speak Outside Michael Brown’s Funeral in St. Louis

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    Thousands of people lined up to pay their respects at Michael Brown’s funeral on Monday in St. Louis, Missouri. The killing of the 18-year-old African American by a white police officer in Ferguson has sparked weeks of protest and conversations about race, both around the country and in the local community. Democracy Now!’s Aaron Maté was in St. Louis and spoke with mourners as they filed into the Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church. "I know about Martin Luther King, I know about Emmett Till, but I am actually living something that should have stopped years and years ago," says local resident Anne Hamilton. "We just want, as African Americans, to be treated fairly and to be given the same advantages." St. Louis resident Elwood Harris responds to the protests, which have at times involved looting. "What else can we do? We took the Martin Luther King approach, protesting and peace, but there is no peace, and there is no justice," Harris says. "But there will be justice in this case, I really do believe."

  • There’s Something Wrong in America: Michael Brown’s Funeral Sparks Calls for an Enduring Movement

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    More than 2,500 people filled the sanctuary of Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis for Michael Brown’s funeral. Another 2,000 packed into overflow rooms. Speakers included Rev. Al Sharpton, attorney Benjamin Crump and Brown’s cousin, Ty Pruitt. "America is going to have to come to terms with, there’s something wrong that we have money to give military equipment to police forces, but we don’t have money for training and money for public education and money to train our children," Sharpton said.

  • Vijay Prashad: 2011 NATO Bombing of Libya Led to Rise of Militias Now Fighting for Oil-Rich Land

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    Libya is experiencing its most intense fighting since the 2011 NATO-backed campaign to remove Muammar Gaddafi. On Monday, the Libyan Parliament that was replaced in an election in June reconvened and chose an Islamist-backed deputy as the new prime minister. This now leaves Libya with two rival leaders and assemblies, each backed by armed factions. Meanwhile, The New York Times has revealed Egypt and the United Arab Emirates launched airstrikes twice in the last week against Islamist-allied militias battling for control of Tripoli. Despite the strikes, the Islamist militants managed to solidify control of the capital of Tripoli by taking over the main airport. "[The U.S. and NATO] bombed the country and opened the door for the different militias to now compete against each other," says Vijay Prashad, professor of international studies at Trinity College. "So the day Gaddafi was killed, from then onwards, the militias have basically been at each other’s throats."